Your New Year’s Resolution Doesn’t Need To Be a Revolution!

Soon it will be January, and you know what that means. The gyms will be packed with slightly chubby people overexerting themselves, the health food shops will be stocking up for people who don’t even like green vegetables, and your workplace will be unbearable as most of your colleagues go through withdrawal for the caffeine, alcohol or tobacco they’ve gone cold turkey on with no preparation. Yes, it’s the time of year people desperately try to better themselves with New Year’s Resolutions.

Before you make your resolution, think about the one you made last year. Did you keep it up all year? Do you even remember what it was? That’s the thing, isn’t it? Everyone makes these grand declarations and puts their full effort in for a month or two, before dropping it like a lukewarm potato, and ultimately forgetting the whole thing until the next New Year.

The simple fact of the matter is, the reason most people don’t keep to their New Year’s Resolution is because they going too big and having a revolution instead, without any real plans to help them continue that major change. Without anything solid to support this big revolution, they revert back to their life as it was before. Take it from someone who’s getting ready for 2017 having kept their resolution all year; this is how to achieve your New Year goals.

The first thing is to think of something achievable. Yes, you want to be a better version of you, but if you never exercise is going to the gym twice a week for an hour anywhere near likely to be something you can keep up forever? Or, maybe, you could go at least once a month or join a fun sports class. Likewise, instead of quitting cigarettes cold turkey for the year, aim to cut down and end the year cigarette-free.

Similarly, if you don’t really want to do something you aren’t going to be motivated to do it. You don’t like ‘healthy’ food, you don’t really want to start that dramatic diet, and you aren’t really that worried about your weight. So don’t make that revolution, make a resolution related to a more enjoyable self-improvement: Read a book every month; Learn a new language; Take up a hobby.

Of course, it’s not as simple as just having an achievable goal; if only it were! Plenty of people make New Year’s Resolutions, keep to them perfectly for a month or two, and then just… stop. There are a few simple things you need to do to keep your resolution all year. The biggest barrier would seemingly be forgetting, so setting yourself reminders is a sure fire way to prevent that reason for resolution drop-off.

Depending on what your resolution is, there are a few good ways to keep it to mind. Put a picture of the activity in places you’ll see it often, such as on your fridge or as your phone background. Write yourself a note on your calendar, inside the cover of your notebook, or on a sticky note by your workspace. Subscribe to a YouTube channel related to your resolution so it’s uploads remind you, or rename your alarm to get daily reminders. As long as you can’t forget all about it, you’re doing well.

It’s not enough to just remember, you have to get into the habit. Once something is part of your routine, it’s easier to keep doing it than it is to stop. If it’s something you want to do daily, do it the same time each day and maybe add it to your morning routine – do your exercises as part of your getting up and ready for work or school, read a novel during your commute, or swap your breakfast for a healthier choice.

For other things, set aside a set time each week; go tidy the attic every Thursday after work, go for a jog on a Saturday morning, or watch YouTube tutorials for the skill you want to learn on a Monday night. Soon enough you’ll be into the swing of it and won’t even need to think about it. Joining a class or club can help too, giving you motivation while you’re still getting yourself in the habit.

The point of New Year’s Resolutions isn’t just to do them, of course, but to achieve something. Keeping track of milestones can help you stay motivated, whether you’re tracking how long you’ve kept it up or tracking how much you’ve changed or learned. Make a note in your calendar every month, marking how well you’ve kept your resolution that month and how far through the year you are. For a “Do X every week” type resolution, keeping a list of what book, film, etc you read, watched, etc not only helps you know what you’ve done but also show you have many weeks and months you’ve done it for.

If your resolution is weight or health related, it’s obvious to weigh or otherwise health check yourself regularly to keep track. For other body goals and skills, however, you can check in other ways to see how far you’ve come. Take an online test each month to see how much you’ve learned, make an item with your new skill every month and compare it to the previous months ones, or keep note of your exercise times and distances.

Achieving your goals might be reward enough, and between the life changes and watching your milestones pass by might be the best end result for you. It’s not always enough, though, and giving yourself other rewards can give you a bigger sense of achievement and celebration. Treat yourself whenever you reach a milestone!

You could relate it to your resolution; going out for dinner if its food related or buying a nice new novel if it’s something to do with reading or fiction. It doesn’t have to be related, of course, and you can treat yourself with a video game purchase or allow yourself as much TV time as you spend on learning your new skill, for example.

If you manage to keep your New Year’s Resolution until the end of the year, you’ll have that happy feeling of achievement, be improved as a person in whatever way you chose, and ready to carry on, upgrade or choose something else entirely for the next year.